Larry Page on Doing Crazy Things
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Larry Page on Doing Crazy

Larry Page, CEO and co-founder of Google, speaks quite boldly about how you accomplish things that matter. You have to do a few crazy things.

Now, while most book marketing activities are going to be boring, prosaic, by-the-book activities, once in a while you just have to take a flyer. Do something crazy.


Contact that one person you figure would never pay attention to you.

Try to book yourself on The Today Show.

Pitch O Magazine.

Create and promote a viral YouTube video.

Produce an Internet meme.

Make a phone call to the President.

Write to the Pope.

Say a little prayer for your book — and, more important, for your potential readers.


If you’re not doing something crazy, you’re doing the wrong things. — Larry Page

Take a chance today.

Of course, I don’t think any of the above suggestions are crazy. I believe they are eminently practical and should be done when appropriate for your book.

Don’t settle. Do something today.

About John Kremer

John Kremer is author of 1001 Ways to Market Your Books, the Relationships Matter Marketing program, and many other books and reports on book marketing, Internet marketing, social media, and book publicity. -- .


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Larry Page on Doing Crazy Things — 2 Comments

  1. Pingback: Book Marketing Tip of the Week: 27 March 2013 | Book Marketing Bestsellers

  2. Doing crazy things may actually improve one’s sanity (does that sound crazy?) Actually, the crazy thing I’m doing may be in NOT publishing my memoir (which is 99.9% ready to go) of raising my five children on an Alaskan homestead. I have been told by Those Who Know that it is well written and interesting.

    My trepidation stems from the fact that, along with stories of encounters with bears, moose and questionable humans, and stress-producing experiences including running out of firewood at 60 below zero, I have included a lot of myself in my writings. By “myself” I mean emotions, thoughts, feelings, experiences that led to extreme dysfunction, clinical depression, and a large stomach ulcer by the age of thirty, with no help in sight. My only choice was to “pull myself up by my bootstraps.” I finally packed my five small children into a rickety station wagon, left my husband, and drove down the Alcan Highway to the “Lower 48.”

    A large part of my apprehension is that in order to make a cohesive story it was necessary to say some negative things about my husband–although I did it as gently as I could. But I suppose the major factor goes back to exposing so much of the inner self to the public.

    The more I write the more I realize that I am way off the subject of “Doing Crazy Things,” but even so, I would appreciate any helpful comments.

    Thank you!

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